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Item Number
1480VI1732
Record Number
235987
Title
Vietnam: A Television History - Homefront, U.S.A.
Language
English
# of Media
1
Creation Date
1987
Collection
R. Mike Womack Collection
Association
FSB Ripcord Association
Media Type
Moving Image (VHS)
Length
60:00 min/sec
Copyright Statement
WGBH Educational Foundation
Physical Location
D144.1A
Online Status
Item Not Available Online
Description
A significant but little known turning point in the Vietnam War occurred in August, 1967, when a public opinion poll showed, for the first time, a majority of Americans considered U.S. Participation in the war a “mistake.” As Senator William Fulbright (D., Arkansas) observed then, “I don't recall…as strong a division of opinion …as now exists with regard to the Vietnamese War. That's true, I believe, in the [Senate Foreign Relations] Committee. I think-from the reports in the newspapers and magazines-that exists in the country.” Focusing on the hearts and minds of Americans as they tried to evaluate an undeclared war whose origins and objectives were unclear, and whose costs were growing, Fulbright is one of a gallery of Americans, both for and against the Vietnam War, who appears in “Homefront, USA.” The episode opens with President Johnson's somber Christmas Eve address five weeks after the assassination of John Kennedy. Johnson appealed for “peace on earth, good will toward all men” in the spirit of slain Presidents Kennedy and Abraham Lincoln. It continues, offering a clear and measured overview of the subsequent domestic upheaval: the waves of anti-war demonstrations; the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy; the rhetoric of the 1968 Presidential candidates; the Nixon administration attacks on the press; the shooting of students at Kent State University; the “hard hats: marching in New York City; and Vietnam veterans throwing their medals away on the steps of the U.S. Capitol. As the country's longest war continued and casualties mounted, Americans in the cities and the heartland searched their souls, as a slowly widening credibility gap separated them from their leaders.
Citation
Vietnam: A Television History - Homefront, U.S.A.,  1987, R. Mike Womack Collection, The Vietnam Center and Archive, Texas Tech University. Accessed 21 Nov. 2014. <http://www.vietnam.ttu.edu/virtualarchive/items.php?item=1480VI1732>.
Pub. Credit Line
1480VI1732, R. Mike Womack Collection, The Vietnam Center and Archive, Texas Tech University
 
Added: 14 Jan 2005[Updated: 27 Nov 2013]
Item not available online
Item Not Available Online
Item Number
1480VI1733
Record Number
235998
Title
Vietnam: A Television History - Tet, 1968
Language
English
# of Media
1
Creation Date
1987
Collection
R. Mike Womack Collection
Association
FSB Ripcord Association
Media Type
Moving Image (VHS)
Length
60:00
Copyright Statement
WGBH Educational Foundation
Physical Location
D144.1A
Online Status
Item Not Available Online
Description
General William Westmoreland, U.S. Commander in Vietnam, sounded a note of optimism on November 231, 1967. “A new phase is now starting. We have reached an important point when the end begins to come into view.” North Vietnam was also thinking about new beginnings. In late January, 1968-on the eve of Tet, the Vietnamese New Year-a coordinated, nationwide offensive of Viet Cong and Northern troops struck the major cities of South Vietnam, shocking the American public. The U.S. Embassy in Saigon was also a target of attack. Hue, the former capital city of South Vietnam was held for 25 days, and became the location of a counter-assault, leading to the heaviest fighting of the entire offensive. “Tet, 1968” examines the offensive and its political consequences for President Lyndon Johnson. HarryMcPherson, then counsel to the President, recalls cable traffic from Saigon reporting a decisive Viet Cong defeat, yet domestic television reports showed desperate battles in the streets of Saigon and other cities. “There were awful contradictions…It was very disturbing.” Former Secretary of State Dean Rusk elaborates upon how a military defeat became “a brilliant political victory for them [the communists] here in the U.S… “ Clark Clifford, a staunch Johnson supporter and former Secretary of Defense, tells how he and other “secret doves” collaborated, persuading the President to disengage U.S. forces from Southeast Asia. On March 31, 1698, Johnson delivered a conciliatory speech. He also announced he would not see re-election that year. Although Americans fought in Vietnam for five more years, Tet marked the end of the U.S. policy of military escalation in Vietnam.
Citation
Vietnam: A Television History - Tet, 1968,  1987, R. Mike Womack Collection, The Vietnam Center and Archive, Texas Tech University. Accessed 21 Nov. 2014. <http://www.vietnam.ttu.edu/virtualarchive/items.php?item=1480VI1733>.
Pub. Credit Line
1480VI1733, R. Mike Womack Collection, The Vietnam Center and Archive, Texas Tech University
 
Added: 14 Jan 2005[Updated: 27 Nov 2013]
Item not available online
Item Not Available Online
Item Number
1480VI1734
Record Number
236000
Title
Vietnam: A Television History - Legacies
Language
English
# of Media
1
Creation Date
1987
Collection
R. Mike Womack Collection
Association
FSB Ripcord Association
Media Type
Moving Image (VHS)
Length
60:00 min/sec
Copyright Statement
WGBH Educational Foundation
Physical Location
D144.1A
Online Status
Item Not Available Online
Description
In the U.S., wartime hostility and wariness have had their post-war counterparts in the attitudes of many combat veterans and former activists in the anti-war movement. The national celebration that greeted the U.S. hostages returning from Iran in early 1981 brought a chorus of protests from Vietnam veterans who felt the country had ignored or denigrated their service, suffering and accomplishments. Issues such as the longterm effect of exposure to the defoliant “agent orange” and post-traumatic stress disorder began to capture wider public attention. “Legacies” reviews the impact of the war's conclusion, both in Vietnam, which has experienced widespread political repression, and in Cambodia, which has suffered a genocidal holocaust under the Khmer Rouge's regime. In recent years, the architects and executors of policy during the Vietnam era have reached their respective conclusions about the war's meaning and have offered their respective conclusions about the war's meaning and have offered their retrospective judgments. Many of their statements are woven into this episode, which examines the “Vietnam analogy” in relation to post-Vietnam political crises in many other global regions. “Legacies” attempts to assess the present mood and future prospects of the '60s generation-children of the post World War II baby boom who came of age during the tumultuous years of the Vietnam War. How that divided generation defines and implements its responsibilities will be the most significant of all the legacies of Vietnam.
Citation
Vietnam: A Television History - Legacies,  1987, R. Mike Womack Collection, The Vietnam Center and Archive, Texas Tech University. Accessed 21 Nov. 2014. <http://www.vietnam.ttu.edu/virtualarchive/items.php?item=1480VI1734>.
Pub. Credit Line
1480VI1734, R. Mike Womack Collection, The Vietnam Center and Archive, Texas Tech University
 
Added: 14 Jan 2005[Updated: 27 Nov 2013]
Item not available online
Item Not Available Online